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How to deal with bossy co-workers

  •  Posted on Jul 03, 2018  by  | No Comments

How to deal with bossy co-workers

 

Bossy co-workers and superiors are a workplace norm. It’s probably something we all can relate to: the boss who tries too hard to be a boss or the newly-appointed-manager who desperately wants to prove his capability or maybe even the colleague who wants to be your boss. Either way, it isn’t a pleasant experience.

If you google “how to deal with bossy co-workers?”, you will find hundreds of articles and columns detailing ways to get around such people but perhaps something you may not find, is the suggestion of becoming your own boss.

By this, I don’t mean going into self-employment but maybe considering a career path that gives you the independence and freedom to work with minimal supervision might not be a bad idea. Recruitment, for example, could be an option that you haven’t considered before

At my job as a recruiter, I have almost free reign on how I organize my day, what I do and what I say, which language I work in, who I call and who I don’t call and the list goes on. Basically, I run my own desk from start to finish and am able to reap the benefits of my hard work at the end of the day. As someone who generally likes to be left to my own devices, I greatly appreciate the ability to be independent but besides the freedom I have, the independence that I enjoy also translates into trust.

This sense of trust and acknowledgement is what I appreciate the most about my job.  I know for a fact that my boss and colleagues trust me 100% to get the job done without having to breathe down my neck. This then translates into higher motivation levels on my part as I don’t want to disappoint my colleagues and want to reach the expectations they have of me as well as my own.

Of course, every now and then we all need a little bit of guidance and support from our superiors and in these moments, I am able to rely on my colleagues for support and advice. As in most recruitment agencies, I have my own desk but at the same time am sitting in a room with some very talented recruiters who are always happy to share great candidates and give me the advice I need.

So, all in all, recruitment gives you the freedom and independence to work as you want and reap the benefits of the hard work that you sow and at the same time, it allows you to work together with a group of people who share the same goals and motivation as you do.

I hope this short article was able to give you a quick insight into the life of a recruiter. If you’re sick of your bossy co-workers and want to work in an independent manner, consider becoming a recruiter!

 

Sarah George

 
 

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